Belly the pig gave birth to eight little piggies!

There was great excitement today on Landmeterskop Farm when the widow Potts, Belly the pig, gave birth to eight little piggies! One died and is now with his late father, Mr Potts, somewhere over the rainbow bridge in piggy heaven. Two are a bit weak and are being hand-fed, but the rest are all doing fine. They are cuteness personified!


Video: Oops Ma, don’t sit on us! https://www.facebook.com/valerie.steenkamp.9/videos/936372263075355/
Video: Proud Mama and piggies! https://www.facebook.com/valerie.steenkamp.9/videos/936371546408760/

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Landmeterskop’s Bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis)

At last we managed to get some photos of one of the pairs of Bat-eared Foxes with their four cubs. Initially we only spotted the four cubs, but they were later “herded” by mom and dad who led them in a fast run to safety from the prying human eyes! Although their Afrikaans names are Bakoorjakkals or Draaijakkals, they are not jackals. They actually belong to the canine family – the same as dogs. Draaijakkals describes how it runs as it twists and dodges and can turn quickly on its own track.

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The name Bat-eared Fox originates from their large bat-like ears, which enhances their hearing but also serves to dissipate body heat. This species is small and jackal-like in appearance, with slender black legs and a black, pointed muzzle. A light-coloured or white band runs across the forehead to the base of the ears. The coat is silver-gray, and longish with a grizzled appearance. The tail is long and bushy, black on top and near the tip.

Their total body length varies between 75 and 90 cm; their height at shoulder is 35 cm and their weight ranges between 3 and 5 kg.

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The jaws are not very strong and the teeth are small and weak, but they have lots of teeth (46 to 50) – more than any other mammal – with between 4 and 8 extra molars for grinding. Mastication (chewing) is very fast and prey is well chewed. A step-like protrusion, the subangular lobe, on the lower jaw anchors the large digastric muscle. This causes a quick chopping jaw action with very little side-to-side movement which allows them to chew 5 times per second! That makes them a perfect termite-mashing machine!

These foxes are widespread in western and central areas of the southern African subregion. It prefer areas of short grass or bare ground in open grassland or scattered shrubland.

They are active mainly at night (nocturnal) but are seen during the early morning or evening, normally avoiding the heat of the day by sheltering in thick shrub, tall grass areas or burrows. Our photos were taken over midday while they were out enjoying the winter sun after the rain and cold, playing and foraging in the newly sprouted wheat fields. These foxes are active diggers and will excavate their own burrows, but often modifies those dug by another species. Although normally silent, they communicate with soft contact calls, whines and chirps and a loud bark when alarmed.

Bat-eared Foxes locate their prey primarily by hearing. While foraging they stop periodically with head cocked and ears pointing to the ground, listening for the sounds of grubs and termites below the surface. Then they leap forward and dig shallow holes with their forepaws. The claws on the forefeet are long and ideal for digging in even the hardest soil. An insect-eater, they are the only carnivore to have largely given up eating mammalian prey. They cannot tackle big prey.

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A large part of their diet consists of termites and dung beetles; other prey include insects, millipedes and centipedes, scorpions, spiders, fruits, eggs, snakes, lizards, frogs, occasional small mammals, birds and soft tubers and roots.

Pairs mate for life (monogamous), and family groups consist of parents and their offspring. Different family groups may mix together when feeding. The gestation period is about 50 days; litters of two to five cubs are born in underground dens from October to January, dispersing in June or July.

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Predators occasionally include large raptors and caracal and they succumb to diseases such as rabies and distemper. Their resemblance to jackal leads to conflict with stock farmers who falsely accused of them of killing livestock and regard them as vermin. They also become victims of traps set for problem animals and large numbers are killed on the roads. Currently the species is not regarded as threatened but there is the future threat of loss of suitable habitat due to human activities, building, farming, etc.

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The Percy Lister story

As it had always been Gill and Ken Lister’s (actually Dad Ken’s), wish to own a domesticated teacup pig, they in January 2014 purchased “Percy the Pig”. He was only two months old and a real little squealer, measuring less than a ruler in length. They fed him on Pronutro and yoghurt. He was a real cute little boy. They loved him dearly and he quickly became part of the Lister Clan of six cats, two dogs, four chickens and a parrot.

After around six months it became apparent that Percy was not a teacup pig. The breeder told them that fully grown, he should be the size of a Jack Russell Terrier. After further investigation, it came out that he is actually classified as a mini pig, so his eventual size would be more than double that of a teacup pig.

So they had no choice but to move Percy outside and he lived in their backyard with the other animals. In the mornings and evenings he joined his human family in the house for a few hours, and the rest of the day he spent outside. He became a real mischievous boy when indoors. He would chew the wooden floors and 6-year-old Chrissy’s dolls! Eventually he became a little too destructive to be allowed indoors.

On reaching puberty, this young piggy was all ready and set for action! With no other female his size or kind around, to everyone’s chagrin, the pug, Bella, became the object of his amorous displays! A serious decision had to to be made, and when Percy became a little short-tempered too, castration became inevitable.

After a year and a few months, his human parents knew that it was not fair on him to be kept in the backyard alone and isolated from the close human contact he was used to during weekdays. The family agreed that it would be best for Percy if he could find a new home with companions somewhere on a farm where the owners would love him and take good care of him.

Theunis and Valerie of Landmeterskop farm near Stanford came to the rescue in offering Percy a forever home with their other pigs. On Saturday, 20 June 2015, Ken, Gill and Chrissy brought Percy to his new home and family, a real “piggy heaven” where he had his own house prepared for him with fresh straw and food. And after meeting the rest of the pig-family, the chickens, the alpacas – Angelo, Lily and Roweno – he was happy to start roaming and inspecting the lush green field… And although they had to say goodbye to Percy for now, the Listers left with peace in their hearts, knowing that this is not farewell, as they were invited to come visit Percy as often as they can.

Percy and family arriving on Landmeterskop:

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And while her dad took Percy to his new home, Chrissy and mom had time to feed the lambs:

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Dad Ken and Valerie of Landmeterskop helping Percy out of the bakkie:

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The pregnant widow, Mrs Potts, was the first one to come and say, “Hi!” to Percy… A little bit grumpy herself, after the untimely demise of her husband, Mr Potts, due to his aggression towards humans, she soon let the young man know that he should keep a safe distance for the time being!

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Then it was time to meet Mr Kolbroek who at first was lying, fast asleep, in the reeds in a furrow. But, oh my! When he caught sniff of the young Percy he couldn’t get up quickly enough to greet the stranger! No-one has ever seen Mr Kolbroek move his big, fat body as fast as he did on Saturday trying to get to Percy!

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While Percy were introduced to the rest of the pigs, Chrissy had time to feed the alpacas. Here she is with Lily.

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Then Percy was shown his new “house” with fresh straw bed, his own beloved blanket which he had long ago “privatised” from where it was drying on the line, and some food in his trough! His family left him, happy and content in the good care of the Landmeterskop team. And with an open invitation to come visit Percy as often as they can, his human family also left with peace in their hearts, knowing that they had done the right thing…
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Mr Potts and Mrs Belly join the Landmeterskop family!

Recently, Mr Potts and Mrs Belly, two pot-bellied pigs, joined our animal family on Landmeterskop. Although their very distant ancestors came from China, these two were born on a smallholding near Teslaarsdal, Caledon. In honour of their arrival, the pigsties on our farm had been restored! As pigs, and especially pot-bellied pigs, are very affectionate animals that love companionship and body closeness, and are often kept as pets. They can weigh anything from 43 to 136 kg, and can live up to thirty years. This pair had no trouble settling in with our other pigs, the Kolbroeks, and the alpacas, goats, chickens and human visitors. They are indeed very happy and thriving!

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Night Sky over Landmeterskop by Stephen Hammer

I was really looking forward to being able to photograph the night sky and Milky Way as the farm is an ideal venue to do this. Unfortunately, the weatherman didn’t play the game and we arrived at the farm in heavy overcast conditions and this made for very challenging photography light. After much digging through the archives in my head, I eventually came up with a game plan to show you guys what I was seeing… shoot the stars through the clouds!! Now that is not a photograph you often get to see.

These pics were all taken in and around the yard around the Duck Pond Room.

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This series shows the start and prep for a photograph of the Milky Way over the cottages. First pic is to get my framing right, the second shows the start of the Milky Way, and the last pic is the Milky Way “waking up”. I always think of this as God sprinkling his blessings on the farmers’ fields. This “tower” of stars is truly impressive. After the last photograph I was well and truly frozen (my own fault as I did not bring the proper clothing) and went off and had my supper

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These photographs were taken just before sunrise on Sunday morning @ ± 06h15. I was busy getting ready to go out and look for the Bat Eared Foxes, when I glanced out the window and saw this beautiful “Dragon of Stars”. I knew I only had a few minutes to get these photographs before there was too much light and I would not be able to photograph this.

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All these photos were taken by Stephen Hammer, Cape Town based wildlife photographer, and are copyrighted. We are very excited that Steve has agreed to do a series of photography courses in future here on Landmeterskop. We shall post the details of these soon!

For more of Steve’s work, visit his website: http://stephenhammer.co.za

Black-shouldered Kite (Elanus caeruleus) & the field mouse!

Cape Town-based wildlife photographer Stephen Hammer and his wife, Lee-Anne, spent the weekend on Landmeterskop trying to capture our family of Bat-eared Foxes on camera. This first sequence of views was taken on the way to look for the shy little foxes on Sunday morning. It was truly beautiful to see… and quite cold up on the hill. The cold air is beautifully clear and haze-free. Winter is the time to photograph landscapes and Landmeterskop has some very good potential for this.

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The little Bat-eared Foxes did not put in an appearance, although Steve and Lee-Anne searched for them late afternoons and early mornings! But, Steve was fortunate to get this magnificent sequence of a Black-shouldered Kite (Elanus caeruleus) eating a field mouse.

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Black-shouldered Kite (Elanus caeruleus)
Afrikaans: Blouvalk

Black-shouldered Kite (Elanus caeruleus)

Afrikaans: Blouvalk

The Black-shouldered Kite is a small, graceful raptor and the most voracious eater in the raptor family. It needs to consume up to 25% of its body mass every day – that is the equivalent of about two mice. This means each bird probably kills around 700 mouse-sized animals a year.

Roberts Birds of Southern Africa VII estimates there are about 100 000 Black-shouldered Kites in southern Africa, so if we assume each bird takes two mice a day, that adds up to about 70 million mice being consumed by this species alone every year. Think of how many mice there are out there that are not being eaten!

It prefers the grasslands probably because prey is easier to see than in the more densely-wooded lowveld.

Black-shouldered Kites are solitary hunters by day, yet often roost communally at night. They usually spend between 4 and 10 hours a day in flight, but also often hunt from a perch.

One of their characteristics is to hover (air-perch) in one place above the ground searching for prey. Black-shouldered Kites range widely. The longest range so far recorded was that of a bird ringed in the former Transvaal and recovered in northern Mozambique, 915km away. Another bird ringed at the same time was recovered in the opposite direction – in the Cape, 645km away.

Stephen’s website: http://stephenhammer.co.za

Steve also took beautiful photos of the night sky over Landmeterskop… and we shall post some of them soon! And we are very excited to announce that Steve has agreed to do a series of photography courses in future with us.

Blue Cranes chasing Cape Fox!

We are very excited to have Cape Town based wildlife photographer, Stephen Hammer and his wife, with us in a fortnight’s time. Stephen and his wife will go on night-time and early morning expeditions to see if they can take photos of our two families of Bat-eared foxes. Yes, we’ll tell you all about them once we have photos to show you! We have also seen the occasional Cape Fox on the farm.

The Cape fox (Vulpes chama), also called the cama fox or the silver-backed fox, is a small fox with black or silver gray fur with flanks and underside in light yellow. The tip of its tail is always black.

The Cape fox tends to be 45 to 61 cm (17.7–24 inches) long, not including its 30 to 40 cm (11.8-15.75 inch) tail. It is 28 to 33 cm (11–13 in) tall at the shoulder, and usually weighs from 3.6 to 5 kg (8–11 lbs).

As most foxes, they are nocturnal and most active just before dawn or after dusk. During the day, it typically shelters in burrows underground, holes, hollows, or dense thickets. It is an active digger that will excavate its own burrow, although it generally modifies an abandoned burrow of another species, such as the springhare, to its specific requirements. They are solitary creatures, and although they form mated pairs, the males and females are often found alone, as they tend to forage separately. They are not especially territorial but will mark their territories with a pungent scent. Although a normally silent fox, the Cape fox is known to communicate with soft calls, whines or chirps. However, it will utter a loud bark when alarmed. When in an aggressive mood, the Cape fox is known to growl and spit at its attacker. To show its excitement, the fox lifts its tail, the height of the tail often indicating the measure of excitement.

Cape foxes are omnivorous and will eat plants or animals. Although they prefer invertebrates and small mammals such as rodents, they are opportunists and known to hunt and eat reptiles, rabbits, spiders, birds, and young hares. They will also eat eggs, beetle larvae, and carrion, as well as most insects or fruits. Cape foxes have been reported to be able to kill lambs up to three months of age, although this is a rare occurrence.

Enjoy these amazing photos Stephen took of Blue Cranes and Cape Foxes near Caledon. These Blue Cranes did not like the family of Cape Foxes being in the same field as them. The birds actually chased the foxes all the way to their den and kept them there for a good while.

Stephen, in his own words, has “an almost child like fascination for all creatures, both great and small. I am constantly astounded and amazed at just how intricate, ingenious and smart Mother Nature is. If we are prepared open our eyes, Mother Nature will reveal her beauty and magnificence to anybody who has the patience and desire to see and learn.

I am always amazed at how few people out there realize just how much bird and wildlife there is here in Cape Town.

I believe that if we educate and make people aware of what we have here on our doorstep,  maybe they will take more care of the environment. The more people that are aware of nature, the more potential custodians of nature we will have. I would like my grandchildren to see what I’ve seen, not in a photograph, but alive, wild and free.

We are very fortunate to have the most unbelievable abundance of both fauna and flora right here on our doorstep. We are truly spoilt for choice in that we have wetlands, forests, arid semi-desert,  mountains, grasslands, coastal marshes and beaches, all within a 150km radius of the city center.

It is with a great sense of pride that I can show the rest of the world just how beautiful and magnificent the wildlife and landscapes of Cape Town and South Africa truly are…”

Stephen’s website: http://stephenhammer.co.za

To read more about the Blue Crane, South-Africa’s national bird: https://landmeterskop.com/2014/08/10/blue-cranes-our-national-bird-landmeterskop/

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Family Friendly Farm Getaway by Liza

I’d highly recommend you book soon, as Landmeterskop is popular, and it’s worth it.

Reblogged from: http: I Heart Your Outfit

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An opportunity not to be missed!

Landmeterskop-Stanford-HarvestONLY THREE MORE DAYS TO WIN, WIN, WIN!!!!!!! Entries close on 13 April at 22h00. If you have not yet entered your name, liked and shared both our pages, you better hurry up now! The winner of this wonderful 2-night midweek stay for 2 people on landmeterskop.com, plus a free lunch at Stanford Harvest Farm Kitchen, plus a free bottle of our local wines, will be announced on THURSDAY 16 APRIL 2015. All you have to do is like and share our page as well as that of Stanford Harvest and write “liked and shared” in the comments under this post on each page. Just click on the respective names in this post which will take you to our pages! For more information about Stanford Harvest Farm Kitchen, please visit their blog: https://stanfordharvest.wordpress.com/