Belly the pig gave birth to eight little piggies!

There was great excitement today on Landmeterskop Farm when the widow Potts, Belly the pig, gave birth to eight little piggies! One died and is now with his late father, Mr Potts, somewhere over the rainbow bridge in piggy heaven. Two are a bit weak and are being hand-fed, but the rest are all doing fine. They are cuteness personified!


Video: Oops Ma, don’t sit on us! https://www.facebook.com/valerie.steenkamp.9/videos/936372263075355/
Video: Proud Mama and piggies! https://www.facebook.com/valerie.steenkamp.9/videos/936371546408760/

Landmeterskop’s Bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis)

At last we managed to get some photos of one of the pairs of Bat-eared Foxes with their four cubs. Initially we only spotted the four cubs, but they were later “herded” by mom and dad who led them in a fast run to safety from the prying human eyes! Although their Afrikaans names are Bakoorjakkals or Draaijakkals, they are not jackals. They actually belong to the canine family – the same as dogs. Draaijakkals describes how it runs as it twists and dodges and can turn quickly on its own track.

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The name Bat-eared Fox originates from their large bat-like ears, which enhances their hearing but also serves to dissipate body heat. This species is small and jackal-like in appearance, with slender black legs and a black, pointed muzzle. A light-coloured or white band runs across the forehead to the base of the ears. The coat is silver-gray, and longish with a grizzled appearance. The tail is long and bushy, black on top and near the tip.

Their total body length varies between 75 and 90 cm; their height at shoulder is 35 cm and their weight ranges between 3 and 5 kg.

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The jaws are not very strong and the teeth are small and weak, but they have lots of teeth (46 to 50) – more than any other mammal – with between 4 and 8 extra molars for grinding. Mastication (chewing) is very fast and prey is well chewed. A step-like protrusion, the subangular lobe, on the lower jaw anchors the large digastric muscle. This causes a quick chopping jaw action with very little side-to-side movement which allows them to chew 5 times per second! That makes them a perfect termite-mashing machine!

These foxes are widespread in western and central areas of the southern African subregion. It prefer areas of short grass or bare ground in open grassland or scattered shrubland.

They are active mainly at night (nocturnal) but are seen during the early morning or evening, normally avoiding the heat of the day by sheltering in thick shrub, tall grass areas or burrows. Our photos were taken over midday while they were out enjoying the winter sun after the rain and cold, playing and foraging in the newly sprouted wheat fields. These foxes are active diggers and will excavate their own burrows, but often modifies those dug by another species. Although normally silent, they communicate with soft contact calls, whines and chirps and a loud bark when alarmed.

Bat-eared Foxes locate their prey primarily by hearing. While foraging they stop periodically with head cocked and ears pointing to the ground, listening for the sounds of grubs and termites below the surface. Then they leap forward and dig shallow holes with their forepaws. The claws on the forefeet are long and ideal for digging in even the hardest soil. An insect-eater, they are the only carnivore to have largely given up eating mammalian prey. They cannot tackle big prey.

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A large part of their diet consists of termites and dung beetles; other prey include insects, millipedes and centipedes, scorpions, spiders, fruits, eggs, snakes, lizards, frogs, occasional small mammals, birds and soft tubers and roots.

Pairs mate for life (monogamous), and family groups consist of parents and their offspring. Different family groups may mix together when feeding. The gestation period is about 50 days; litters of two to five cubs are born in underground dens from October to January, dispersing in June or July.

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Predators occasionally include large raptors and caracal and they succumb to diseases such as rabies and distemper. Their resemblance to jackal leads to conflict with stock farmers who falsely accused of them of killing livestock and regard them as vermin. They also become victims of traps set for problem animals and large numbers are killed on the roads. Currently the species is not regarded as threatened but there is the future threat of loss of suitable habitat due to human activities, building, farming, etc.

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The Percy Lister story

As it had always been Gill and Ken Lister’s (actually Dad Ken’s), wish to own a domesticated teacup pig, they in January 2014 purchased “Percy the Pig”. He was only two months old and a real little squealer, measuring less than a ruler in length. They fed him on Pronutro and yoghurt. He was a real cute little boy. They loved him dearly and he quickly became part of the Lister Clan of six cats, two dogs, four chickens and a parrot.

After around six months it became apparent that Percy was not a teacup pig. The breeder told them that fully grown, he should be the size of a Jack Russell Terrier. After further investigation, it came out that he is actually classified as a mini pig, so his eventual size would be more than double that of a teacup pig.

So they had no choice but to move Percy outside and he lived in their backyard with the other animals. In the mornings and evenings he joined his human family in the house for a few hours, and the rest of the day he spent outside. He became a real mischievous boy when indoors. He would chew the wooden floors and 6-year-old Chrissy’s dolls! Eventually he became a little too destructive to be allowed indoors.

On reaching puberty, this young piggy was all ready and set for action! With no other female his size or kind around, to everyone’s chagrin, the pug, Bella, became the object of his amorous displays! A serious decision had to to be made, and when Percy became a little short-tempered too, castration became inevitable.

After a year and a few months, his human parents knew that it was not fair on him to be kept in the backyard alone and isolated from the close human contact he was used to during weekdays. The family agreed that it would be best for Percy if he could find a new home with companions somewhere on a farm where the owners would love him and take good care of him.

Theunis and Valerie of Landmeterskop farm near Stanford came to the rescue in offering Percy a forever home with their other pigs. On Saturday, 20 June 2015, Ken, Gill and Chrissy brought Percy to his new home and family, a real “piggy heaven” where he had his own house prepared for him with fresh straw and food. And after meeting the rest of the pig-family, the chickens, the alpacas – Angelo, Lily and Roweno – he was happy to start roaming and inspecting the lush green field… And although they had to say goodbye to Percy for now, the Listers left with peace in their hearts, knowing that this is not farewell, as they were invited to come visit Percy as often as they can.

Percy and family arriving on Landmeterskop:

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And while her dad took Percy to his new home, Chrissy and mom had time to feed the lambs:

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Dad Ken and Valerie of Landmeterskop helping Percy out of the bakkie:

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The pregnant widow, Mrs Potts, was the first one to come and say, “Hi!” to Percy… A little bit grumpy herself, after the untimely demise of her husband, Mr Potts, due to his aggression towards humans, she soon let the young man know that he should keep a safe distance for the time being!

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Then it was time to meet Mr Kolbroek who at first was lying, fast asleep, in the reeds in a furrow. But, oh my! When he caught sniff of the young Percy he couldn’t get up quickly enough to greet the stranger! No-one has ever seen Mr Kolbroek move his big, fat body as fast as he did on Saturday trying to get to Percy!

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While Percy were introduced to the rest of the pigs, Chrissy had time to feed the alpacas. Here she is with Lily.

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Then Percy was shown his new “house” with fresh straw bed, his own beloved blanket which he had long ago “privatised” from where it was drying on the line, and some food in his trough! His family left him, happy and content in the good care of the Landmeterskop team. And with an open invitation to come visit Percy as often as they can, his human family also left with peace in their hearts, knowing that they had done the right thing…
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